BIRDING THE LUNE ESTUARY, THE FOREST OF BOWLAND AND BEYOND.

Saturday, 13 April 2019

Friday 12 April.

Another original title!

Conder Green. Pete Woodruff

I found a Common Sandpiper at Conder Green yesterday. Probably a returning bird, but the interesting thing about the sighting, the bird was found at the same location where I saw the wintering bird on eight visits out of ten to Conder Green, predictably on the bank to the left of the red boat. 

Lesser Black-backed Gulls Conder Pool 12 April. Pete Woodruff.

If the behaviour of these two is anything to go by, it looks like Conder Pool might have a breeding pair at last. These/a pair arrive and loaf around here annually, but never go on to nest, though they gave the impression they might do, but certainly did yesterday. There was an absolute nil regarding anything new and not much old on Conder Pool, but 3 Black-tailed Godwit noted in the creeks.

On the Lune Estuary, in a mixed flock of roosting birds similar to Monday, c,100 Black-tailed Godwit, and c.60 Bar-Tailed Godwit. At Cockersand, 520 Golden Plover in the field behind Lighthouse Cottage, 3 White Wagtail in field behind Bank House Cottage, a Stock Dove and Kestrel seen.

Habitat Destruction.    


I took the top photograph of work in progress at Glasson Dock on 30 October, and below what the scene looks like behind at job done. Yesterday I discovered the destruction has continued along the coastal path towards Conder Green, the white speck is the long time yacht stranded on the marsh, a distance of something like a mile, with trees, bushes, wild flowers, and grasses all devastated as habitat for birds, and excellent for a number of butterfly species....Gone!

3 comments:

Marc Heath said...

I would guess your Common Sandpiper was a wintering bird. May be wrong but no doubt there's plenty of places to hide up.

Pete Woodruff said...

Can't believe the Conder Green wintering Common Sandpiper has escaped detection since last October Marc. Although I've been off the road for seven months, I've done the circuit a time or two since my return, and faithful to their locations I had no sightings, though you are certainly right in suggesting there are plenty of hiding places for the bird to have kept it's head down. In any case, the bird may have been some other winterer turned up....We'll never know.

The mean date for spring Common Sandpiper in Lancashire is 4 April, so I'll stick with my bird on Friday being a 'probable return'.

Richard Pegler said...

I'd certainly have been impressed by some of those sightings, Pete. Not by that destruction of habitat, however. It seems the world has gone mad lately. If it's not habitat destruction, it seems to be habitat denial with netting - usually leading to habitat destruction. The situation is desperate!

My very best wishes - - - Richard