BIRDING THE LUNE ESTUARY THE FOREST OF BOWLAND AND BEYOND.................................................................................................SKYLARK GERALDINE STOCKDALE

Sunday, 17 April 2022

After The Fall, And Four Nice Chats

As the result of a fall in perfect conditions, in the four hours around the Birk Bank area, I recorded at least 22 Willow Warbler most heard only,  Otherwise, a lone Chiffchaff, 4 Meadow Pipit, 3 Buzzard soaring and mewing, and 2 Dunnock in the car park on Rigg Lane.

It was good to get myself back on the top of Birk Bank again on Thursday to find 4 Stonechat. A little early in the season to get the full picture of breeding birds here, but if I get myself back up at the end of April, the picture will be more convincing.

Buff-tailed Bumblebee on flowering Bilberry. Pete Woodruff.

I saw a few Buff-tailed Bumblebee, and also saw White-tailed Bumblebee, the taxonomy of which is complex and the subject of ongoing research. The label Bombus lucorum is used to include two other species, B.magnus and B.cryptarum, and are treated as 'aggregate' species....Add to this, much more science of interest....But I'm out of my comfort zone now!

Green Hairstreak. Pete Woodruff.

Other insect interest was 5 Green Hairstreak seen.

Up the path from the car park, I was confronted by a rogue Red Grouse, the second of its kind, with one behaving in the same manner was seen several times a couple of years ago in this area. They are aggressive, and the last one actually flew at me on one occasion. I reckon neither of these birds can fly any distance if at all, and behave for some reason in a retarded manner.

Bilberry Bumblebee. Copyright David Whitaker.

It would have been great to have found my Birk Bank Buff-tailed Bumblebee was a Bilberry Bumblebee like David Whitaker did. With the help I've had from some experts, I may decide to take on the quest to hunt them down in Bowland. 

I'm grateful to Ian Mitchell for being in touch with the moth in his trap recently.

Blossom Underwing. Ian Mitchell.

A scarce moth, not common anywhere, found locally in the south and Wales, and infrequently seen in NW England. Its name is given by the pink-tinged hindwings distinguishing it from most other species. Nice one Ian, many thanks.  

5 comments:

Richard Pegler said...

I was utterly amazed by your encounter with the Red Grouse, Pete. That's a wonderful piece of video, and I love the sound too.

Had my second Covid booster last week - not sure how much protection it's going to give, however. Information on the subject seems to have gone off the radar.

Take good care - best wishes - - - Richard

Ian Mitchell said...

Like the grouse video Pete.
Nice to see the Green Hairstreak butterflies out they usually seem to be quite a few on the Bowland fells.
Had my first Orange Tip butterfly in my garden last Friday 15th. been a couple since.

Take care - Ian

Marc Heath said...

Great video and what an experience to have. Keep up the good work. I'm always looking in. Take care.

Pete Woodruff said...

'Great video and informative update Pete, cheers Des.

P.S. We met by the river on the road to Marshaw when I was on my bike a month or so ago. Glad to find your blog.'

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This message is labelled 'Unknown' in my comments list. In fact I know the 'unknown' sender as is indicated in the message. It seemed a pity not to be on the comments list on the front page and for this reason I have copied it in here.

Good to hear from you Des, glad you found the blog, and hope to see you again in Bowland this year. If you see a red Beema at the cattle grid at Marshaw, there's a good chance we meet on the road around Tower Lodge.

Kind Regards

Pete.

Pete Woodruff said...

Richard/Ian/Marc....Just to thank you all for looking in along with the other 60, much appreciated.