BIRDING THE LUNE ESTUARY THE FOREST OF BOWLAND AND BEYOND..........................................................................COMMON TERN CONDER POOL IAN MITCHELL

Sunday, 5 June 2022

A Change Of Scenery.

Since my last visit to Conder Green a month ago on 5 May, the change of scenery is best described as dramatic. Notes from an update at Conder Pool, from 47 Avocet young 32 have been predated....In my book, that's a tragedy, but on a positive note, there are an amazing 30 Common Tern currently on Conder Pool, seen as yet another first for this truly excellent location....What next! 

My own records from Conder Pool during the week.... A pair of Little Ringed Plover were seen without any of the young they had in mid-May, they are nesting again at a new site. In my opinion, the count of at least 100 Black-headed Gull with several chicks, points to one of the reasons behind predation on Conder Pool, but no obvious evidence to corroborate this with plenty of other predators like Lesser Black-backed Gull and corvids....the list goes on.

Reed Bunting and Sedge Warbler were in the hedgerow around the pool, and it was good to find House Martins have nests under the eaves at River Winds.

On Saltcote Pond at Glasson, Azure Damselfly in the video, Blue-tailed Damselfly, and Common Blue Damselfly seen. And along the canal Blackcap and Chiffchaff by Christ Church....

....and a Mallard on the canal had a raft of 11 ducklings in tow.

I then decided to switch to Plan B and went to Birk Bank in the hope of finding my first dragonfly of the year....Well that didn't happen!

But I was pleasantly rewarded by a Small Pearl-bordered Fritillary* at rest. I was pleased when it showed its underwing briefly as the breeze blew up. A Buzzard soared overhead, and 3 Willow Warbler ended what I can only describe as an average days birding.

*Steve Graham recorded an amazing 51 Small Pearl-bordered Fritillary last year, at Birk Bank on 14 June 2021.

Common Tern. Howard Stockdale.

I'm grateful to Howard Stockdale for keeping in touch, and for the image of the ringed Common Tern. This bird is one of two currently on Conder Pool.

I'm also grateful to Martin Jump for keeping in touch, and for the header image of the Kingfisher flying off with a good meal in its bill.

The Poplar Hawk-moth has a noticeable attitude at rest, having its hindwings held forward of its forewings, with the abdomen curved up at the rear.

Thanks to Lynn and Ian for the record and image in their Brookhouse garden on Friday.

And Finally.

The end of the post, the beginning of a new day. The Blackbird sings at sunrise around 3.30am from our bedroom window this Sunday morning....Full Volume Magic.

3 comments:

Ian Mitchell said...

Wow what a comprehensive blog - really enjoyed the videos.
Numbers certainly have ramped up at Conder Pool, on a positive note though to have had 15 Avocet chicks at Conder Pool a few years ago would have been amazing.

Saw something the other day I had not seen before, a presumably queen bee flying around with the male on her back.

Thanks for the updates.

Ian

Richard Pegler said...

Hi Pete! Just catching up as I come out of the tail-end of Covid. I'm pleased to say it wan't too bad, but I'm still testing positive. Lindsay is fine now and has been testing negative for three days. All in all, not as unpleasant an experience as it might have been.

I too have not yet seen my first dragonfly of the year, but intend to try and rectify the situation as soon as I test negative. I suspect that you have now already found your first?

I really do envy you that Small Pearl-bordered Fritillary - a species that I've never seen.

I very much enjoyed this post Best wishes - stay safe - - - Richard

Pete Woodruff said...

Ian....I saw my first ever copulating bees on the boardwalk at Birk Bank last year, they were Common Carder. Your sighting sounds interesting. Thanks for looking in Ian.

Richard....Definitely not found my first dragonfly, though a little better with damselflies. We need to get rid of the dreaded wind!

Hope the Covid issue is now heading towards history for yourself and Lindsey.

Thanks for looking in Richard.